Sharing ideas and all things ICT… I am a Y2 teacher, AHT, ICT subject leader and mum

Archive for the ‘Research’ Category

Leading on learning

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Punctuating what seems like a very long term was a well planned opportunity for schools in both Westbury and Warminster to merge and become inspired.  Held at Kingdown School in Warminster (and very hosted at that), the final day of the term was an INSET crammed full of interesting and inspiring workshops but to start was a keynote speaker, who, until that day I had not heard of, but from that day I will not forget!  Alison Peacock is the headteacher of Wroxham Primary School in Potters Bar, and has taken her school from failing to outstanding by arguing that grouping by ability actually holds children back.  Alison and her staff have removed the limiting beliefs  about fixed abilities and fixed futures and has instead become a listening school.  Listening to her speak resonated with many of my beliefs about children.  She spoke with passion and humour especially with her encounters with the current Education Secretary!  A video was shown about all the great things that were happening at her school, including the double decker bus that is a library in the playground!  But more poignantly were the children who spoke with great authority about their learning, challenge and love of school.  Included in the video was an exuberant teacher called Mr Davy who enthused me, and what’s more he was the teacher leading my final workshop – couldn’t wait (especially as others had seen him earlier in the day and were singing his praises!) What a great start to the day.

My first workshop was ‘Challenging learners in Maths’ ran  by two secondary teachers from our local secondary school, Matravers.  Many useful ideas were demonstrated that could be adapted in any year group classroom, such as the ‘So what…’ cards giving a statement such as ‘1 pair of socks cost £1.50’, the children would then think of questions like ‘How much would it cost to buy socks for a spider?’ etc etc.  Good for talking maths and collaboration.  Another idea was having laminated hexagons where the first one said ‘Multiples’ and then the children have to think of other maths areas that link.  These are then written on separate hexagons with the aim of creating a flower but more importantly understanding the different connections.

The second workshop was ‘Inspiring independent learning’ with Alison Peacock who has just written a book called ‘Creating learning without limits’ following research completed at her school.  She spoke of key dispositions such as empathy, generosity, emotional stability, inventiveness, openness, persistence, questioning and humility.  In pairs we then recalled a time when we had encountered these dispositions and how we dealt with them.  An interesting reflective process although I would have loved to hear more about how she changed her school around continuing on from her fantastic keynote.

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Finally, the workshop I had been really looking forward to ‘Good to outstanding’ by Steve Davy a teacher from Wroxham Primary School.  Steve spoke with enthusiasm and an obvious love of his subject when he described the thematic and creative approach to learning that he instils in his classroom.  His frenetic approach was hard to keep up with at times but the amount of content he packed in to 45 minutes was astounding!  Peppered with humour and anecdotes and the odd request for Ritalin only made his presentation more endearing.  Lots of ideas how to incorporate grammar into all year groups were provided and I can’t wait to bring them into my classroom too!

Overall a very inspiring and creative day that provided not only great workshops but also the golden opportunity to share professional dialogue with other colleagues.  I hope we have further opportunities to work as a broader cluster as it is a valuable way to congregate and learn.

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Inspire Create Teach with iPads!

Over the past few years I have been a great advocate of class based action research projects.  They allow me to focus on a particular aspect of eduation whereby I am given time to apply and reflect on my own teaching practice with the aim to improve it.  At the end of March, I submitted a bid for £5000 that would pay for 15 iPads.  My proposal was based on our needs at our school.  The expected outcomes of buying and using the iPads in the classrom would be:

  • Transform teaching and learning by changing the current classroom culture and embedding creative use of ICT
  • Make the classroom teaching and learning more interactive and creative in facilitating learning
  • Facilitate more personalised learning that is strongly linked to learners needs
  • Raise expectations and reduce the gap for lower performers
  • Raise standards in reading and writing for all
  • Close the digital divide and improve standards for all children
  • Motivate and engage reluctant readers and writers
  • Provide a platform for developing speaking and listening skills which in turn impact positively on reading and writing skills
  • Utilising emerging technologies in the classroom and exploring potential impact in supporting learning
  • Develop and embed effective inclusion strategies for children with SEND
  • Initiate an ICT cluster group to share good outcomes and practice
  • Develop role of Digital Leaders
  • Organise a Teachmeet/Kidsmeet

My baseline assessment is  to target a  cohort (unsure which year group at this point as not sure where I’ll be in September) in order to track, monitor and assess achievement and impact throughout the project.  Writing and reading levels will be used as a baseline and ambitious targets set with a specific focus on targeting those children who are underachieving.  Alongside this we would interview children on their attitudes to learning and engagement in this as well as parental observations on this.  This would then be re-assessed at the end of the project.  Interim data and performance indicators will be used to monitor the impact of ICT on learners.

Initial implementation of the iPads would be to provide a contextual hub for learning from which the children would utilise technology to develop language skills by accessing modelled apps, games and research.  Reluctant writers and readers would be engaged and motivated by seeing, hearing and exploring good language with a view to communicate learning by sharing and having an audience.  This could be achieved by provision and access to iPads and the wealth of opportunities they offer.  The focus will be on talk for reading and writing and there are a number of apps and functions on the ipads which will support and enhance this.

By developing the use of ICT in one year group we will be able to use action research to target successful strategies to support learning in reading and writing through the development of language skills.  This can then be disseminated to other classes and enhance the work of the school in raising standards.

Having a bank of iPads offers flexibility of learning as they could be rotated class to class or timetabled for use in class or in small groups across the school.  The iPads will give us provision and access to all children across the school through a range of exciting opportunities.  Other pockets of underachievement could then also be addressed using this medium.

As an aside, we have a number of children with SEND and believe Ipads will provide an additional focus for continued inclusion and enhanced learning.  IPads would be instrumental in providing visual learning, helping with therapy and turn taking.  These devices would also help non-verbal children communicate more effectively.  These children are less likely in some instances to have access to ICT at home so we will be able to reduce the gap for them in their successful use of digital resources as part of learning.

I’m always looking for ways to improve learning and maintain motivation and engagement for the children I teach.  This project is an exciting one which I cannot wait to get underway.  I hope to post my progress throughout this project and share my findings.

Magic Weaving – Why do I need a teacher when I have Google?

Today, over 300 teachers and heads got together to hear an internationally renowned  speaker, Sir John Jones. It was one of those rare INSET days that didn’t fail to inspire all who listened.  Sir John is a key advocate of the need for a major paradigm shift in the philosophy of education. His common sense approach, supported by a clear understanding of thescientific theory of teaching and learning made for some challenging thoughts.  Sir John challenges teachers to reignite their passion for teaching by reminding them of the influence they have over the children they teach, reminding them of the importance of their profession, and ways to reignite their passion for teaching.  Many statistics (sometimes shocking ones) were sprinkled throughout the day, mainly to provide that knee jerk reaction that makes you reflect on your impact on these children in our care.

He challenges us to be ‘water thinkers’ and not ‘rock thinkers’ as water always wins!!  We were asked if you had to choose one of the following: knowledge, skills or attitude to give the children that would change their lives, which one would it be?  Withour exception, we answered attitude yet education is primarily about developing knowledge.  Our curriculum is about the transmission of facts and knowledge and testing memories.

We were then taken through the history of education, brief and to the point.  About how having 30 children in a class stems from the number of soldiers in a company that could be controlled by a sergeant.  Having a fortnight at Easter came about due to lambing, and six weeks in the summer from harvesting – yet we still adhere to these traditions despite our children not being required to help with these seasonal activities.

Sir John said if we were to read The Times every day for 7 days, the avarage person would learn more about theirr world than was learnt throught the 19th century – technology has a huge part to play in the way we view our world.

Taking the place of the 3 R’s (reading, writing and arithmetic) are the increasing values/skills R’s, like resourceful, reasoning, reflective, responsible and resilience. These skills are vital to the acquisition of knowledge, and how this
knowledge applies to life — even, or especially, in subjects like Science, or
mathematics. Take resilience, for example, if children don’t get maths, the way round is not to teach more maths.  The key to improving maths is not giving up when you’re stuck.

Sir John has written a book — The Magic Weaving Business.  In which he reminds teachers of how important they are in the lives of young people.  He gives us the message, “The good news is, the teacher makes the difference. And the bad news is, the teacher makes the difference.”

Many anecdotes are referred to throughout the day.  He was once asked, ‘why do I need a teacher if I have Google?’  He went on to explain that another student answered this searching question by saying that she was going to university to study history because she had a passion for history.  This was due to her teacher not teaching her hisgtory BUT  she taught her the love of history.

There are many factors whic influence a child’s learning, direction, ambition and achievement — poverty, the breakdown of the family, the neighbourhood, etc BUT if you come across a teacher who is a magic weaver, then it can be life-changing!

We know that teachers make a difference.   Ask anyone to name five people who have
influenced their lives and you’re sure to find a teacher among them.  We were reminded of who inspired us to teach and have we ever told them so?  A recollection of a teacher tracing his old teacher aged 90 via email with the opening ‘You won’t remember me?’  The old teacher replied having attached a photo of his student and recollecting him very well.  A following email was sent three days later explaining that the old man had died, but had done so happy with the knowledge of his impact.  This indeed was a touching and emotional account.  I immediately thought of my teacher Mr Gordon Banks who had done the same for me when I was 10.  I wish I had had the opportunity to have told him how much he had meant to me…

A poignant day, full of laughter, joy, reflectiveness, hope and emotion.  Probably the best INSET day I have had the priviledge of attending.